HOW TO MAKE A FUCK IT BUCKET
by Paul "The Rooster" Sedaris:
1. Go get a 1 gallon paint pail.
2. Fill it with candy.
3. Write "Fuck It Bucket" on it.

"When shit gets you down just say, 'fuck it' and eat some mother fuckin' candy."
-- Paul "The Rooster" Sedaris

WELCOME TO BUCKT
My own clusterfuck collection of sweet, shiny things I randomly found and threw together in a pile for future amusement. Enjoy!

CRUSHABLE CONTENT
See my favorite posts from the rest of the Tumblr universe.

 

jamesurbaniak:

natashavc:

tomorrow. 

L.A.: Public School storytelling show Wed. Sept. 3rd at 9 pm at a new location: The Virgil in fashionable Silver Lake (4519 Santa Monica Blvd). Hosted by me with stories by Baron Vaughn, Jenny Yang, Dana Snyder, Kelly Hudson, Ariel Hart, Joey Slamon and Toby Huss. I mean, come on. Reserve here.

BEN GO TO THIS

jamesurbaniak:

natashavc:

tomorrow. 

L.A.: Public School storytelling show Wed. Sept. 3rd at 9 pm at a new location: The Virgil in fashionable Silver Lake (4519 Santa Monica Blvd). Hosted by me with stories by Baron Vaughn, Jenny Yang, Dana Snyder, Kelly Hudson, Ariel Hart, Joey Slamon and Toby Huss. I mean, come on. Reserve here.

BEN GO TO THIS

Grace Hopper, coding legend and very first “debugger”:
While she was working on a Mark II Computer at a US Navy research lab in Dahlgren, Virginia in 1947, her associates discovered a moth stuck in a relay and thereby impeding operation, whereupon she remarked that they were “debugging” the system. Though the term “bug” had been in use for many years in engineering to refer to small glitches and inexplicable problems, Admiral Hopper did bring the term into popularity. The remains of the moth can be found in the group’s log book at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. (Wikipedia)

Grace Hopper, coding legend and very first “debugger”:

While she was working on a Mark II Computer at a US Navy research lab in Dahlgren, Virginia in 1947, her associates discovered a moth stuck in a relay and thereby impeding operation, whereupon she remarked that they were “debugging” the system. Though the term “bug” had been in use for many years in engineering to refer to small glitches and inexplicable problems, Admiral Hopper did bring the term into popularity. The remains of the moth can be found in the group’s log book at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. (Wikipedia)
transitmaps:

Historical Map: Theoretical Diagram of Proposed Transit System, St. Louis, Missouri, 1919
Here’s a map that hyperrealcartography would love: an audacious, almost outrageous, proposal for a transit system in St. Louis drawn up by the City Plan Commission in 1919. The final proposed system shown here would have had the existing streetcars and new rapid transit lines operating side-by-side, described like this in the full proposal:

"The rapid transit system is separated into two distinct systems, that for the routing of surface cars in the downtown district, and that for a distinctly rapid transit system that would operate entirely by subway or elevated tracks within the city. There will be no contact of the two systems, excepting that the stations may be operated in common."

Under this proposal, almost every major street in the city would have had streetcar service. Many of the east-west routes (top to bottom on this diagram) would have funnelled towards new subway loops under the business district, which would have required the total abandonment of the 8th Street railway tunnel (now used by the Metrolink light rail). Seven crosstown lines would have provided comprehensive service for those wishing to bypass downtown.
Note that this is very definitely a theoretical diagram of the system, not a map. Even a very cursory glance at St. Louis in Google Maps reveals that the city’s actual layout is nowhere near as uniform and compliant as this.
The cost for this little project? Around $97 million in 1919: equating to a cool $1.1 billion in today’s money.
Source: Gateway Streets/Flickr
P.S. The entire proposal is scanned and available to read on Google Books: definitely worth a look if you’re interested in early 20th-century city planning.
 

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Theoretical Diagram of Proposed Transit System, St. Louis, Missouri, 1919

Here’s a map that hyperrealcartography would love: an audacious, almost outrageous, proposal for a transit system in St. Louis drawn up by the City Plan Commission in 1919. The final proposed system shown here would have had the existing streetcars and new rapid transit lines operating side-by-side, described like this in the full proposal:

"The rapid transit system is separated into two distinct systems, that for the routing of surface cars in the downtown district, and that for a distinctly rapid transit system that would operate entirely by subway or elevated tracks within the city. There will be no contact of the two systems, excepting that the stations may be operated in common."

Under this proposal, almost every major street in the city would have had streetcar service. Many of the east-west routes (top to bottom on this diagram) would have funnelled towards new subway loops under the business district, which would have required the total abandonment of the 8th Street railway tunnel (now used by the Metrolink light rail). Seven crosstown lines would have provided comprehensive service for those wishing to bypass downtown.

Note that this is very definitely a theoretical diagram of the system, not a map. Even a very cursory glance at St. Louis in Google Maps reveals that the city’s actual layout is nowhere near as uniform and compliant as this.

The cost for this little project? Around $97 million in 1919: equating to a cool $1.1 billion in today’s money.

Source: Gateway Streets/Flickr

P.S. The entire proposal is scanned and available to read on Google Books: definitely worth a look if you’re interested in early 20th-century city planning.

 

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ruth Marshall

RUTH MARSHALL brings attention to illegal wildlife trade and species loss in a way that unites a new, widened audience of scientists, art enthusiasts and the general public. Her textile pelts exemplify how artisan goods have the potential to have higher commercial value than a poached skin on the black market. The result would be a paradigm shift of the incentive in wildlife trade, which is one of the largest illegal activities in the world. Her textiles reinforce that support of conservation and a society’s culture is a more sustainable, viable and lucrative endeavor than the illegal wildlife trade.

Website

installator:

“‘Under the Same Sun: Art From Latin America Today’ on view now at the Guggenheim” (@Guggenheim)

gpoy-everyday
also call to mind this sweet album cover

installator:

“‘Under the Same Sun: Art From Latin America Today’ on view now at the Guggenheim” ()

gpoy-everyday

also call to mind this sweet album cover